EventWax, lubricated planning

March 2nd, 2007 at 12:00 am
 


Event planning is sometimes a hassle regardless how small or big. Well, the small ones sometimes are no hassle but the big ones sometimes really suck. Big ones meanong concerts or huge parties with at least fifty people coming to attend, or weddings that require too many RSVP's. Hiring an event planner is still the best choice yet this costs a lot of money. The next best thing comes in a web based event planner called EventWax.

With EventWax, the user does not need to worry about the invitations and the cancellations anymore. It's done automatically through a website for the event. With this, the user can concentrate more on executing the event (logistics and all).

It works like an online flyer that also doubles as a reservation agent. The process starts by having the user create his own account that bercomes his own admin web page for the events he is organizing (e.g. user.eventwax.com). Then he can begin creating web flyers/announcements for multiple events. Each event of course has a title so this becomes the URL of the announcement (user.eventwax.com/event1.htm). Information (what, where, when) about the event is provided by the user including ticket prices and seat capacity (if applicable). A web flyer is generated upon publishing so invitations can be sent through email or direct access to the URL.

The web flyer is based on a generic EventWax template populated by the information provided by the user. At the bottom of the announcement, there is a register button for attendees to confirm or book their tickets. If the seats are limited, the flyer is automatically updated with the availability of seats.

On the admin's end, he can monitor each event he has organized on the front page of his EventWax account. The Recent activity log will be shown below the list of events. For every event, details of the registrants or bookings will also be seen.

The user can also set up ticket schemes, for example there are limited special passes and standard passes. The event planner will see how many of the invites booked for special passes and standard passes and the availability of the passes.

Lastly, the user can also edit the appearance of the web announcement for the event in the admin area. The event site can be editted by selecting pre-made EvenWax templates or by hard coding the CSS template. This gives the user multiple options in presenting invitations.

All in all, I still think it's better to hire an event planner. EventWax is a tool that can assist the event planner though it will not totally replace the role of the planner since there are some details that cannot be done by the machine. I'm not so sure if EventWax will be very useful for regular Joes organizing their own wedding or other stuff. Nevertheless, the tool presents a lot of useful potential.